All posts filed under: Guide

Guide: Scanning with the Epson v600

First and foremost, I would like to say that I love my V600 scanner. I couldn’t imagine not having it. It’s difficult to imagine the true potential of your photographs until you have total control over how it’s digitized. Sure – there are more sophisticated scanners out there but this scanner does an excellent job for the money. At less than $200, it’s difficult not to get your moneys worth. As a disclaimer, this article is not intended to be any more than a guide for other getting started in scanning at home or looking from someone else’s perspective. I’m not saying it’s the best but it works well for me. The Image I took this photograph on an early morning hike in Hocking Hills, Ohio nearby where I live. I didn’t have my tripod that day but I had Portra 400 loaded in my Mamiya 645 Pro TL (the reviews for each are linked) and had the morning ahead of me. Step 1 – Scanning using Epson Scan software To start, I prefer to …

Guide: White Balancing Film in Photoshop

In this guide I am going to walk you through the 3 techniques I employ to white balance (WB) an image. The third method is more comprehensive and the method I use when I’m really taking my time and/or when the WB is really off. The first method is much faster but doesn’t give as good of results and the second method is a blend of the first and third. Preface Below is the before/after image that I will be using as a demonstration. To complete the edits on the image following white balancing, please see the article where I walk through my techniques for editing/finishing scanned images. Aside from white balancing, it consists of adjusting contrast/brightness and increasing the sharpness of the photograph. Method 1 This method, as stated above, is a lot faster but does not give as good results. The quality of the WB is lower and it darkens the image too much in my opinion. The start, open a curves adjustment and using the baster looking icons on the left, select …

Guide: Getting your first film camera

To start, there are two kinds of people that get into film. Those that inherit a camera and those that don’t. If you were given one from a family member or friend or whatever, I would suggest moving on to picking out film stocks or general advice for film photographers. There is no real reason to replace a fully functioning camera for something ‘better’ for a first camera. For those that need to pick one up, please read on. The most straight forward advice I or anyone else could give on picking out a camera would be to consider first and foremost opportunity and cost. If you were to really think through what you need or want out of a camera and search around at camera shops, on eBay, craigslist, etc… you’ll probably find a great deal. Since this is how I suggest approaching all things of this nature, I’ll start to lay out some things that should be considered when identifying your first film camera. Cost Some serious consideration should be made for what …

Guide: Double Exposures (Multiple Exposures)

The first time I experienced double exposures, it was my grandmother showing me some of her old 6×6 photos in her retro photobooks.  Following that, I found myself going through IG and would be particularly attracted to these photos.  Accordingly, I hit Google and searched for ‘How to take a double exposure’.  There are some resources out there, most of which is for PS and not film.  Having experimented with it enough now and discussing the physics of it with a friend over a beer, I have a much deeper understanding for what’s happening and that has translated to better images. So here we are… I hope I can help you take double exposures you love. For those looking for a simple how-to: If your camera has a multiple exposure switch, engage the switch and take photos to your heart’s content (I would start with a double exposure before going for something with 3 or more). For those that don’t, no fear – you can do it just as easily.  Take your first exposure and …