All posts filed under: Film Review

Review: Kodak Ektachrome E100

Ektachrome was the first slide film I’ve ever tried. I bought a few rolls the day it came out and left on a trip to Arizona the next day. I shot Ektachrome in my Nikon F2 and Fujichrome Provia in my Mamiya 645 Pro TL at the same time while hiking through Lockett Meadow. Needless to say, for it being a first attempt, I went all in and bet everything would turn out alright. For those that are not familiar with slide film, it is very temperamental. By that I’m referring to the exposure latitude (or lack thereof) and tendency to get blown out pretty quickly. As such, you have to get the exposure right on point and err on the side of underexposure. Yes- that’s the exact opposite of most color film. Overall, my thoughts are very positive about this film. So much so that I’ve shot thru several rolls of it and I’ve continued to maintain a stock of it at home, waiting for the sunny weather and long days to come back. …

Review: Fujifilm Fujichrome Provia 100F RDP-III

If you’ve never shot a roll of slide film, you should absolutely do it now. The sensation you get from holding the diapositives (or slides if you’re shooting 35mm and you get them mounted) is exhilarating. I still get the same rush of looking at them the 20th time as I got the 1st time. It’s hard to overstate how much I love Provia. My first foray into slide film was Ektachrome as soon as the new stock came last year. Since Ektachrome wasn’t available in 120 and I wanted the chance to shoot through a roll in my Mamiya on a trip to Arizona we were taking in October, I picked up some Provia. The vibe of it is just unreal. The tones are amazing and there’s so much clarity… I took a good scan of the first photos and printed it out into a 24in x 36in sheet and it couldn’t look any better. I honestly think it’s sharper than an equivalent shot on my digital camera (Sony a7). That’s enough of the …

Review: Kodak Tri-X

To see Kodak Tri-X exposure tested and compared with other B&W film, follow this link.   It took me far too long to give Tri-X the attention it deserves. I shot through several rolls of T-Max 400 and moved into high-speed B&W film stocks like Ilford’s Delta 3200 and Kodak’s TMax P3200. Prior to a trip to NYC in late 2018, I picked up a pro pack of Tri-X 120 and shot it exclusively in my Mamiya 645. All it took for me was that trip and I’m sold. It has just the right amount of grit and the gradient is so unique; the shadows aren’t harsh but much more pronounced than a lot of other films and the brights are unmistakably bright. I’m still shocked at how gorgeous some of these turned out. =Having started using Tri-X, I’ve realized so much of what I looked for and wanted in B&W photography was here.  It was then that I started making my home with this film. Before long, I expect to start experimenting with it …

Review: Kodak TMax P3200

One of my favorite things about B&W film is in its simplicity and not needing to worry about filters when the conditions are anything other than daylight for purposes of white balancing. Often times, when I’m shooting indoors, I don’t have much if any natural light. More often than not when I’m shooting indoors, I can’t count on a lot of natural light and 400 speed film is too slow. In comes 3200 speed film. It’s great. I always have some in the freezer.   The only downside is the fact that it’s only available in 35mm. And even then that’s not that big of a deal. finger’s crossed they eventually come out with it in 120 Between this stock and Illford Delta 3200 in 35mm, I couldn’t suggest this stock more. While the grain is a bit more than I would expect from a 400 speed film, it’s far and away better than Illford’s alternative in terms of grain and feel. At this point, I almost always have a roll of it in one …

Review: Kodak Portra 400

To see Portra exposure tested at box speed as well as pushed 1 stop to 800, follow this link. For a journal article where I pushed Portra 400 1 stop to shoot Hocking Hills at dusk (at 800), follow this link. To see a more formal comparison of Portra 400 with the other two members of the Portra family (Experiment 2), go here. Portra 400 was one of the first stocks I tried when I started getting back into photography and it’s been my go-to for color negatives since then. By and large, I’ve experimented with it more than any other film. I’ve overexposed it, underexposed it, pulled it, and pushed it. It is such an incredibly versatile film, you would be hard pressed to find conditions it can’t work with that other films can. For this reason, it has become one of the most popular film stocks in the world and arguably the most recognizable branding and color palette of any color film. For all these reasons, the hype around Portra 400 has been …